Hosam Al-Samarraie

Hosam Al-Samarraie

Profile

I joined the University of Leeds in 2021 as an associate professor in Digital Innovation Design. I have industrial experience from my years at several design companies (both as designer and freelancer). My experience in the industry has reinforced my interest in pursuing my PhD studies. In 2012, I completed my PhD from Universiti Sains Malaysia, which was fully funded by The Fellowship Program for Research and Innovation. After graduation, I worked as a senior lecturer at USM (2012–2019), then Coventry University (2019–2021).

My research is interdisciplinary in nature as it brings together knowledge from Human-Computer Interaction, Human-Centred Design, and Psychology into UI/UX, education, healthcare, and services– with emphasis on exploring, understanding, comparing, and predicting individuals’ use of digital technology. I am/have been involved in teaching and running workshops for different postgraduate programmes. This includes modules such as Statistics, Visualization, HCI, Professional Experience, and Research Methods.

I have been involved (PI and coresearcher) in several research projects related to the development of innovative digital solutions for learning and health. I am currently investigating various cultural and social aspects of technology utilization and their relation to user, interaction, and certain behavioural changes. My work addresses social, technological, and environmental issues in computerÔÇÉmediated environments, with a focus on businesses in high value sectors such as higher education and healthcare.

Research interests

Over the past 10 years, my research has been focused on the emerging areas of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); Human-Centred Design, and Psychology. The findings of my research are innovative in that they offer new understanding, new methodologies, and simplification of user experience in complex environments.

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)

I am interested in designing and developing user interfaces (UI) and digital solutions that are tailored to specific users’ needs and preferences. User adaptive interaction is one key theme that I am very interested in exploring. For example:

  • My recent work on machine learning in predicting UI design provides valuable insights on how some individual traits (e.g., personality) can modulate the way in which we process and seek information.
  • My work on the development of digital recommender systems offers new ways for maintaining long-term engagement, cognitive load, and attention among learners. Users’ emotional changes and use of digital tools are also part of my research. For example, I studied the potential of using Emotional Intelligence in characterising individual preferences of UI design. I also used EEG to examine changes in users’ emotions when adapting or using new interfaces.

Human-Centred Design

I am also very interested in developing guidelines and recommendations to various design problems. For example:

  • In my work on defining individual perceptual and brain patterns for predicting personality and preferences, I developed a new methodological procedure that consists of four phases and an understanding of how these phases work together. In my opinion, these phases can replace the currently used methods for assessing the personality and preferences of online users, which is a useful and hitherto ignored.
  • My work on BCI and eye-tracking have practical applications in routine tasks and promoting life-long learning. I am interested in developing new design guidelines and recommendations based on the integration of culture, hand dominance, and other individual traits. I aim to provide new prospects to the user-centred design of healthcare and learning systems by showing how certain design features can influence users’ interaction, memorability and readability.

Psychology

As we know, psychology is an essential part in the study of users’ needs, and I am interested in exploring how certain behavioural, cognitive, and emotional traits can advance our understanding of UI design. I regularly use Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) and eye-tracking methodologies to help me understand individual learning behaviour, interaction, cognitions, and emotions. I also use eye-tracking tools (through pupil dilation and pupil variation during saccades and fixations) to measure aspects related to users’ attention, cognition, and interaction, especially when processing visual information or interface design elements in natural settings.

PhD supervision

I have experience in supervising Master and PhD students. I am willing to supervise PhD students who want to conduct empirical and experimental research on topics related to my interests. I am also open to exploring new areas in relation to understanding the application of new technologies/design techniques in various settings and situations. 

<h4>Research projects</h4> <p>Any research projects I'm currently working on will be listed below. Our list of all <a href="https://ahc.leeds.ac.uk/dir/research-projects">research projects</a> allows you to view and search the full list of projects in the faculty.</p>

Qualifications

  • PhD in Philosophy 2012
  • Master in IT 2008

Student education

I am/have been involved in teaching and running workshops for different postgraduate programmes. This includes modules such as Statistics, Visualization, HCI, Professional Experience, and Research Methods.

<h4>Postgraduate research opportunities</h4> <p>We welcome enquiries from motivated and qualified applicants from all around the world who are interested in PhD study. Our <a href="https://phd.leeds.ac.uk">research opportunities</a> allow you to search for projects and scholarships.</p>