Sadler seminar series

Sadler Seminar Series 2018-19

Inflatable globe, photographed by Fenia Kotsopoulou

photo by Fenia Kotsopoulou

Sir Michael Sadler (1861-1943) was a Leeds Vice Chancellor famed for his open mind, adventuresome tastes and commitment to research to the lasting benefit of the University’s art collection and much more. 

The Sadler series began in 2015 and continues to supports colleagues wishing to pursue research questions that, to be answered well, require collaboration across disciplinary lines. 

The Sadler Seminars run for a year with seminars each semester and will be linked with funding for workshops, outreach/impact activities, grant-writing and administrative support.

2018-19 projects

In the scheme's fourth year, the we are delighted to be supporting the following projects:


Activist Tactics: Performing Geographies of Social Change
Conveners: Aylwyn Walsh (PCI) and Paul Routledge (School of Geography)

The series enables a dialogue between performance and geography. We invite activist educators in South Africa and colleagues in the UK to consider the values of the particularities of place and locatedness in activist movements. Land rights and decolonisation is the background that frames and forms the optics for the issues to be explored. 


Creating /Curating the Decolonial Classroom
Convener: Fozia Bora (School of Languages, Cultures and Societies)

Decolonial research addresses the long-standing universalisation of subjective European systems of knowing, conducting research and teaching. In this cross-Faculty seminar series, we address two principal themes: periodisation, in which conventional chronologies (ancient, medieval, modern and postmodern) naturalise particular value-laden views of history while constraining critical views of their genealogy and agendas; and the orthodoxy of disciplines, often rooted in colonial-era classifications but with little or no methodology for dealing with other knowledge systems. The series will allow some twenty or so Leeds academics, with our partners at West Yorkshire museums and in the Special Collections of the Brotherton Library, to clarify, sustain and develop a set of decolonial research impulses. 


The Transcultural Fantastic
Convener: Ingo Cornils (School of Languages, Cultures and Societies)

This Sadler Seminar Series on The Transcultural Fantastic will open up the rich traditions of the Fantastic from a transcultural and interdisciplinary perspective, investigating utopian and dystopian thought in art, fiction and film, as well as science fiction, folktales and fantasy literature. 


An Interdisciplinary Perspective, or: What do academic disciplines have to say about psychiatry?
Convener: Mike Finn (School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science)


The Archive after Cecil Roth: Jewish studies, cultural histories and the Cecil Roth Collection
Conveners: Eva Frojmovic (School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies) and Jay Prosser (School of English)

The seminars aim at exploring some of the untapped strengths and hidden treasures of the multilingual collection of the historian Cecil Roth (1899-1970), and to place it in the context of the history of collecting Judaica and Jewish studies, before, during and after WW2 and the Holocaust.


The Performance of Political Feeling
Convener: Beth Johnson (School of Media and Communication)

This series aims to engage with politicians, performers, writers, musicians, filmmakers and academics through a series of seminars, screenings, workshops and interviews, to facilitate and contribute to interdisciplinary research in this important and emerging area. 


The War Veteran in Culture and Society
Convener: Katy Parry (School of Media and Communication)

The figure of the war veteran is a familiar trope in public history, culture and debate. But how are the familiar associations of the veteran (masculine, resilient, white, hetereosexual) being challenged in scholarship, archival research, literature and public art, and how is the veteran’s own voice situated in such representations? In addressing such questions, this series hopes to better understand notions of militariness and post-militariness in the United Kingdom and beyond.