In the media archive

In the media archive 2019

Microphone in radio station booth

January 2019

Arab mother tongue is not Arabic and it from extinction (BBC Arabic, 29/11/2018) Professor Janet Watson (LCS) discusses endangered Arabic languages. Translated from Arabic.

Roma: Mexican film industry blooms with Oscar nominations a century after its origins in the Chihuahua desert  (The Conversation, 30/1/2019) Professor Duncan Wheeler and Dr Rebecca Jarman (both Languages, Cultures and Societies) have written an article concerning how Mexico's booming film industry is revisiting its roots in the same desert in which it has its origins way back in 1914.

Fluorochemicals should be phased out of waterproof clothing, study argues (Environment JournalOnline, 30/1/2019) Further coverage: Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
Also in: Consumer Affairs, Ecotextile News & Chem Europe

Research shows how waterproofs using fluorochemicals are over-engineered for consumers (News-Medical.Net, 30/1/2019) Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
Also in: Phys.org, Science Daily &  University news story

The untold story of museums and the art market (Apollo Magazine, 28/1/2019) An article by Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS) about curating ‘SOLD!’, a new exhibition which takes visitors on a journey through the history of antique dealing.

Back to black: Is monochrome, whether in fashion, design or photography, cooler and more sophisticated than colour? (Esquire Singapore, 28/1/2019) Over the centuries colour has gained a reputation for being cheap and tawdry. Monochromatic black, white and grey, on the other hand, are still associated with sophistication and cool. But why? Professor Regina Lee Blaszczyk (History) comments.

Giving voice to forgotten women who made history (Yorkshire Post, 24/1/2019) PhD alumna and stand-up poet Kate Fox (Performance and Cultural Industries) is profiled ahead of her new show celebrating forgotten women from the north. 
(PDF available on request)

Can blue light reduce train suicides?(BBC Future, 22/1/2019) Professor Stephen Westland (Design) is quoted in an article concerning how some train stations are installing blue lamps above train station platforms to attempt to deter people from committing suicide in those places.

Radio: Free Thinking (BBC Radio 3, 22/1/2019) As Oscar nominations are announced, Dr John Gallagher (History) discusses language in period dramas such as The Favourite and Mary Queen of Scots. 

Leeds leads the way in fashion research  (Fashion United.uk, 18/1/2019) The School of Design is conducting research to support innovation and improve sustainability in the fashion industry. Professor Stephen Russell (Design) is quoted.

Colette: writer, feminist, performer and #MeToo trail blazer (The Conversation, 16/1/2019) Professor Diana Holmes (Languages, Cultures and Society) writes about how the French writer Colette's work, and the way she lived her life, represent a vibrant and radical feminism in tune with the #MeToo spirit of today. 

Was Kim’s China visit an economic lifeline for border development? (South China Morning Post, 17/1/2019) Dr Adam Cathcart (History) wrote an article which argues that Chinese hopes for development of northeastern provinces through North Korean cooperation were once too ambitious, but aren’t necessarily dead now.

Exam time 100 years ago for PoWs in Skipton's Raikeswood Camp (Telegraph & Argus, 16/1/2019)
A further insight into life for German officers as they were held in Skipton's Raikeswood First World War prisoner of war camp has been revealed through the translation of diaries secretly written by inmates and smuggled out following their release. The translation project is led by Anne Buckley (Languages, Cultures and Societies). Also in Craven Herald.

Beyond Rosa Luxemburg: five more women of the German revolution you need to know about (The Conversatio, 14/1/2019) Professor Ingrid Sharp and Dr Corinne Painter (both Languages, Cultures and Societies) have co-written an article concerning female revolutionaries in the German revolution.

Woman's Hour (BBC Radio, 14/1/2019) An exhibition of photographs, These Four Walls: A Secret History of Women Homeworkers, opens tomorrow at the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery. This interview features its historian and photographer creators. From 16m39s. 

Radio: Richard Stead Breakfast Show (BBC Radio Leeds, 10/1/2019) Music by Jewish operetta composer Joseph Beer will be performed for the first time in the UK tonight by his daughter, as part of a conference organised by Professor Derek Scott (Music). His music was suppressed by the Nazis. Soprano Beatrice Beer discusses his life. (from about 50m)

Asian Network's Big Debate (BBC Asian Network, 9/1/2019) Dr Jasjit Singh (PRHS) discusses the recently imposed ban on inappropriate selfies at the Golden Temple. From 2:08:01.

Kim Jong Un meets Xi, tours a Chinese medicine plant, then goes home (Washington Post, 9/1/2019) Adam Cathcart (History) comments on the relationship between Kim Jong Un and Xi Jinping 

New Year, New Podcast Episodes (Post-Traditional Buddhism, 9.1.2019) A podcast features Dr Mickel Burley (PRHS) and gets his thoughts about spirituality, Buddhism, rebirth and more.

Franchir la Manche (dna.fr 4/1/2019) Music composed by Professor Martin Iddon (Music) is mentioned in Dernières Nouvelles Alsace. In French. Paywall on article, PDF available upon request.

Can the Fashion Industry Ever Really Be Sustainable? (The Fashion Law 4/1/2019) Dr Mark Sumner (Design) authors this article discussing the difficulties fashion has in becoming sustainable and argues that brands need to refocus their aims.  
Originally written for The Conversation

The Topping Tooters of the Town (BBC Radio 4 Extra, 2/1/2019) Emeritus Professor Richard Rastall (Music) contributes to this celebration of the music of the Waits - a professional band of musicians who played for civic and ceremonial occasions in major towns across the country until 1835.  

 

February 2019

Morgan le Fay: how Arthurian legend turned a powerful woman from healer to villain (The Conversation, 31/1/2019) Dr Marta Cobb (History) wrote an article concerning new portrayals of Morgan le Fay. 

Arab mother tongue is not Arabic and it from extinction (BBC Arabic, 29/11/2018) Professor Janet Watson (LCS) discusses endangered Arabic languages. Translated from Arabic.

Roma: Mexican film industry blooms with Oscar nominations a century after its origins in the Chihuahua desert  (The Conversation, 30/1/2019) Professor Duncan Wheeler and Dr Rebecca Jarman (both Languages, Cultures and Societies) have written an article concerning how Mexico's booming film industry is revisiting its roots in the same desert in which it has its origins way back in 1914.

Fluorochemicals should be phased out of waterproof clothing, study argues (Environment JournalOnline, 30/1/2019) Further coverage: Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
Also in: Consumer AffairsEcotextile News & Chem Europe

Research shows how waterproofs using fluorochemicals are over-engineered for consumers (News-Medical.Net, 30/1/2019) Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
Also in: Phys.orgScience Daily &  University news story

The untold story of museums and the art market (Apollo Magazine, 28/1/2019) An article by Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS) about curating ‘SOLD!’, a new exhibition which takes visitors on a journey through the history of antique dealing.

Back to black: Is monochrome, whether in fashion, design or photography, cooler and more sophisticated than colour? (Esquire Singapore, 28/1/2019) Over the centuries colour has gained a reputation for being cheap and tawdry. Monochromatic black, white and grey, on the other hand, are still associated with sophistication and cool. But why? Professor Regina Lee Blaszczyk (History) comments.

Giving voice to forgotten women who made history (Yorkshire Post, 24/1/2019) PhD alumna and stand-up poet Kate Fox (Performance and Cultural Industries) is profiled ahead of her new show celebrating forgotten women from the north. 
(PDF available on request)

Can blue light reduce train suicides?(BBC Future, 22/1/2019) Professor Stephen Westland (Design) is quoted in an article concerning how some train stations are installing blue lamps above train station platforms to attempt to deter people from committing suicide in those places.

Radio: Free Thinking (BBC Radio 3, 22/1/2019) As Oscar nominations are announced, Dr John Gallagher (History) discusses language in period dramas such as The Favourite and Mary Queen of Scots. 

Leeds leads the way in fashion research  (Fashion United.uk, 18/1/2019) The School of Design is conducting research to support innovation and improve sustainability in the fashion industry. Professor Stephen Russell (Design) is quoted.

Colette: writer, feminist, performer and #MeToo trail blazer (The Conversation, 16/1/2019) Professor Diana Holmes (Languages, Cultures and Society) writes about how the French writer Colette's work, and the way she lived her life, represent a vibrant and radical feminism in tune with the #MeToo spirit of today. 

Was Kim’s China visit an economic lifeline for border development? (South China Morning Post, 17/1/2019) Dr Adam Cathcart (History) wrote an article which argues that Chinese hopes for development of northeastern provinces through North Korean cooperation were once too ambitious, but aren’t necessarily dead now.

Exam time 100 years ago for PoWs in Skipton's Raikeswood Camp (Telegraph & Argus, 16/1/2019)
A further insight into life for German officers as they were held in Skipton's Raikeswood First World War prisoner of war camp has been revealed through the translation of diaries secretly written by inmates and smuggled out following their release. The translation project is led by Anne Buckley (Languages, Cultures and Societies). Also in Craven Herald.

Beyond Rosa Luxemburg: five more women of the German revolution you need to know about (The Conversatio, 14/1/2019) Professor Ingrid Sharp and Dr Corinne Painter (both Languages, Cultures and Societies) have co-written an article concerning female revolutionaries in the German revolution.

Woman's Hour (BBC Radio, 14/1/2019) An exhibition of photographs, These Four Walls: A Secret History of Women Homeworkers, opens tomorrow at the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery. This interview features its historian and photographer creators. From 16m39s. 

Radio: Richard Stead Breakfast Show (BBC Radio Leeds, 10/1/2019) Music by Jewish operetta composer Joseph Beer will be performed for the first time in the UK tonight by his daughter, as part of a conference organised by Professor Derek Scott (Music). His music was suppressed by the Nazis. Soprano Beatrice Beer discusses his life. (from about 50m)

Asian Network's Big Debate (BBC Asian Network, 9/1/2019) Dr Jasjit Singh (PRHS) discusses the recently imposed ban on inappropriate selfies at the Golden Temple. From 2:08:01.

Kim Jong Un meets Xi, tours a Chinese medicine plant, then goes home (Washington Post, 9/1/2019) Adam Cathcart (History) comments on the relationship between Kim Jong Un and Xi Jinping 

New Year, New Podcast Episodes (Post-Traditional Buddhism, 9.1.2019) A podcast features Dr Mickel Burley (PRHS) and gets his thoughts about spirituality, Buddhism, rebirth and more.

Franchir la Manche (dna.fr 4/1/2019) Music composed by Professor Martin Iddon (Music) is mentioned in Dernières Nouvelles Alsace. In French. Paywall on article, PDF available upon request.

Can the Fashion Industry Ever Really Be Sustainable? (The Fashion Law 4/1/2019) Dr Mark Sumner (Design) authors this article discussing the difficulties fashion has in becoming sustainable and argues that brands need to refocus their aims.  
Originally written for The Conversation

The Topping Tooters of the Town (BBC Radio 4 Extra, 2/1/2019) Emeritus Professor Richard Rastall (Music) contributes to this celebration of the music of the Waits - a professional band of musicians who played for civic and ceremonial occasions in major towns across the country until 1835.  

 

April 2019

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pieces:
 

 

The cultural and creative sector needs to start looking beyond the middle class (Wales Online, 30/3/2019) Profile of Visiting Research Fellow Dr Simon Dancey (PCI - AHC),  CEO of the Creative & Cultural Skills organisation.

Facebook Removes Accounts Linked to Duterte’s Former Social-Media Manager (Wall Street Journal, 29/3/2019) Research co-authored last year by Jason Cabanes (Media & Communication - AHC) into fake political social media accounts in the Philippines is cited.

Do we need to decolonise history? And if so, how? (History Extra 25/3/2019) According to Dr Nina Wardleworth (Languages, Cultures and Societies), language learning is the key to decolonising the history curriculum.
A further history of dealing

Antiques Trade Gazette (25/3/2019) 'Antique Dealers: Buying, Selling and Collecting' runs until May 25 and focuses on three well-known dealerships: Ronald A Lee, Roger Warner and Phillips of Hitchin, all of which donated archives to the Brotherton Library Special Collections. Co-curated by Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS).
 
Collection's new lease of life online (Yorkshire Evening Post, 21/3/2019- Print) Coverage of University of Leeds's Roth Collections of manuscripts. PDF available upon request.
 
The unspoken violence of Donald Trump’s border wall (The Conversation, 20/3/2019) Dr Nour Halabi (Media and Communication) writes about how man-made barriers can harm humanity for centuries.

Radio: Nick Ahad (BBC Radio Leeds, 20/3/2019) Further coverage: Dr Pippa Marland (English) was interviewed on a number of BBC local radio stations about yesterday's Land Lines/AHRC crowd-sourced nature diary celebrating the first day of spring. From about 53m50s.
Also on BBC Radio Cornwall, Cumbria, Coventry and Warwickshire, York, Ulster, Somerset, Hereford and Worcester, Lincolnshire, Guernsey, Jersey and Shropshire.
University news story

Radio: Today (BBC Radio 4, 16/3/2019)
Dr Pippa Marland (English) previews a project launching on Wednesday to create the first ever crowd-sourced nature diary, celebrating the first day of spring. It's part of the AHRC-funded Land Lines research project. From 1h29m50s.
 
Is Fast Fashion Really Killing The Planet? Are cheap clothes really as bad as you've heard? (FashionBeans, 14/3/2019) Dr Mark Sumner (Design) gave evidence to the UK government’s Environmental Audit Committee on the rag trade’s impact.
 
Jiaodong folk paper-cutting exhibition kicks off tour of Europe (Global Times -China, 13/3/2019) Organized by the Yantai Art Museum, an exhibition of Jiaodong folk paper-cutting art opened at the Foyer Gallery at the School of Design on Monday.
Also in Chinese Economical Times.

TV: Afternoon Live (BBC News Online 11/3/2019) Dr Helen Graham (FAHACS) is interviewed about a new exhibition, Above The News, which is part of a three year AHRC-funded research project looking at the National Science and Media Museum’s relationship with Bradford, in collaboration with the University. Clip available on request.  

Political Crisis in Spain Forces General Election (The Global Observatory, 12/3/2019)
Dr Angel Smith (Languages, Cultures and Societies) wrote an article concerning how the current Spanish government has found itself under fire from all sides, including opposition leaders and Catalan nationalists.

Culture Swap (The Times, 11/3/2019) The Swallows and Armenians project, inspired in part by Special Collections' Arthur Ransome Archive, is mentioned.
 
Here is how Kremlin-backed conspiracy theories help keep Vladimir Putin in power (Raw Story, 11/3/2019) Further coverage: Dr Ilya Yablokov (Languages, Cultures and Societies) writes about conspiracy theories concerning Russian politics. This article originally appeared in The Conversation.
 
Celebrating the Undeniable Passion Of the Matador (Vice UK 6/3/2019) Professor Duncan Wheeler (Languages, Cultures and Societies) comments in an article concerning how Spaniards are debating the future of bullfighting, but its defenders—and the next generation of toreros—see it as an intractable part of their culture.

Stories of Bradford told in major exhibition (Telegraph and Argus 6/3/2019) A new exhibition is part of Bradford’s National Museum project, a three year AHRC-funded research project looking at the National Science and Media Museum’s relationship with Bradford, in collaboration with the University and led by Dr Helen Graham (FAHACS).
 
Breakfast : 2nd March, 07:26 AM GMT
BBC 1 East 2nd March - Broadcast
Dr Fiona Douglas (English) was interviewed about the New York Times' British-Irish dialect quiz. Segment was repeated at approximately 9.40am on the same day. Clip available upon request.

Political debates have no effect on voting preference, according to studies (Interaksyon, 4/3/2019)
Cites a 2016 study led by Professor Stephen Coleman and Dr Giles Moss (both Media and Communication), which found that political debates of candidates are ineffective in changing voting preferences but it does increase public interest on the campaign.
 
New exhibition uncovers musical treasures at the University of Leeds (Artdaily.org 2/3/2019) Coverage of, “Gather them in”: the Musical Treasures of W.T. Freemantle, which is guest-curated by Dr Bryan White (Music).
Pick of the Week

Features SOLD! (Country Life, 27/2/2019 - Print), the exhibition about the antiques market co-curated by Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS) at County Durham's Bowes Museum. PDF available.
 
Exhibition explores history of antiques trade (Antique Collecting, 28/2/2019) Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS) is quoted in an article concerning the exhibition 'SOLD! The Great British Antiques Story', which he is the Guest Curator of.
 
Exhibition explores history of antiques trade (Antique Collecting, 28/2/2019) Dr Mark Westgarth (FAHACS) is quoted in an article concerning the exhibition 'SOLD! The Great British Antiques Story', which he is the Guest Curator of.
 
Radio: Mornings (BBC Radio Scotland - from 1h53m, 27/2/2019) Dr Richard Blackburn (Design - AHC) was interviewed on the Kaye Adams Show on BBC Radio Scotland about the environmental impact of washing clothes. The discussion centred on the release of fibres into the water system and carbon emissions. 
 
BBC Radio 5 Live (BBC Radio 5 Live, 27/2/2019) Prof Matthew Treherne was on the Drive programme (Languages, Cultures and Societies) to discuss the issue of the declining number of children studying modern foreign languages at school, now at an 18-year low.

TV: BBC Breakfast (BBC One - from 7.24am, 27/2/2019) Professor Ingrid Sharp (Languages, Cultures & Societies - AHC) is on the Breakfast sofa talking about the importance of learning languages at school.

Kafka’s wonderful ape (Times Literary Supplement, 26/2/2019) Professor Greg Radick (PHRS) shares the cover story, writing about whether a performing chimpanzee may have been the inspiration behind Franz Kafka’s Red Peter.

Future Fashion Factory: a £5.5m industrial action (Drapers, 25/2/2019) Professor Stephen Russell (Design) discusses Future Fashion Factory, a major new AHRC-funded project he leads, which is part of the government's Industrial Strategy.
 
Why do 5 million people watch hair being brushed? (Stylist Magazine, 20/2/2019) Dr Emma Bennett (Performance and Cultural Industries) comments in an article concerning ASMR role play videos.

MPs want legislation to fix UK fashion (Ecotextile News,  19.2.2019) Dr Mark Sumner (Design) gave evidence to an inquiry which aims to change the law to require fashion retailers to perform due diligence across their supply chains and have recommended tax breaks for companies that comply with environmental and social standards.

Why are the train stations of Japan are lit up blue (G1, 18.2.2019) Further coverage: Professor Stephen Westland (Design) is quoted in an article concerning how some train stations are installing blue lamps above train station platforms to attempt to deter people from committing suicide in those places. Translated from Portuguese.
Also in: Época Negócios (in Portuguese), UOL (in Portuguese) & Terra Brasil (in Portuguese)

Class system leaves dialect-matching project tongue tied (The Times, 16/2/2019) Dr Fiona Douglas (English) comments on the New York Times British-Irish dialect quiz.
  
The British-Irish Dialect Quiz (New York Times, 15/2/2019) Clive Upton, professor emeritus (English) comments on this online quiz, which went viral on Friday. Also in the Irish Times.
 
Radio: Pick of the Week (BBC Radio 4, 17/2/2019) A History of the Tongue, the Radio 3 programme presented by Dr John Gallagher (History) was selected among last week's best radio shows. A History of the Tongue on iPlayer
 
Prolific+ Jobs: How Channel 4's move has cemented Leeds as a key media and creative hub (Prolific North, 15t/2/2019) Dr David Lee (Media and Communication) was interviewed about Channel 4's move to Leeds. 
 
LISTEN UP FIVE MORE RADIO SHOWS TO BEND YOUR EARS (Metro, 13/2/2019 -Print) Further coverage: A Radio 3 programme made by Dr John Gallagher (History) about the history of the tongue is a pick of the day in the print edition.  In print - PDF available on request.
 
Khashoggi murder probe shows West puts 'political interests ahead of the protection of journalists' (Radio Sputnik, 12/2/2019) Dr Chris Paterson (Media and Communication) comments on latest developments about the Khashoggi murder plot.
 
Catalan Independence Ref Would be Too Controversial for Any Spanish Gov't - Prof (Sputnik, 12/2/2019) Professor Duncan Wheeler (Spanish) discusses how leading members of the Catalan independence movement are set to go on trial today in the Spanish capital Madrid, on charges of inciting rebellion.

Polish exhibition glory for artists ART (Yorkshire Evening Post 12/2/2019 - Print) Dr Judith Tucker's (Design) work will feature in a new exhibition at the National Museum of Poland. In print, PDF available upon request.

Today's radio choice (The Sunday Telegraph, 10/2/2019) Previews a BBC Radio 3 programme by Dr John Gallagher (History) on the history of the tongue, which aired last night.
Also in: The TelegraphThe TimesThe Sunday TimesProgramme on iPlayer

Weatherwatch: the dangers of protective clothing (The Guardian, 8/2/2019) Coverage of research by Philippa Hill, Dr Richard Blackburn and Dr Mark Taylor (Design) into the use of fluorocarbons in waterproof and protective clothing.
Also in Yahoo News.
 
4 Reasons Vietnam Is Perfect for the Second Trump-Kim Summit (The News Lens, 7/2/2019) Further coverage: Adam Cathcart (History - AHC) comments on the second US-North Korea summit, to take place in Vietnam.

Lotherton presents new contemporary exhibition (THE KINSKY, 7/2/2019) Fashion Forward, a new contemporary fashion exhibition at Lotherton Hall, will feature work from final year students of the University of Leeds.
 
Why Vietnam? 4 Reasons the Southeast Asian Nation Is Perfect for the Second Trump-Kim Summit (TIME, 6/2/2019) Adam Cathcart (History) is quoted in an article concerning the second summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which is taking place in Vietnam.
Also in Yahoo! News USA

Previews: Sunday Feature - History of the Tongue (Radio Time, 6/2/2019) A programme with Dr John Gallagher (History) about the history of the tongue is previewed. It airs on BBC Radio 3, Sunday at 1845. Cutting available on request.
 
Lagos seeks return of Lander stool from British Museum (The Nation, 5/2/2019)  Further coverage: Dr Will Rea (FAHACS) comments in an article concerning the JK Randle Heritage museum, which he was the UK lead curator on.
 
This Arthurian legend turned a powerful woman from healer to villain (World Economic Forum, 5/2/2019) Dr Marta Cobb (History) wrote an article concerning new portrayals of Morgan le Fay. This article originally appeared in The Conversation.
 
Lagos Seeks Return of Historical Sculpture From British Museum (theelitesng.com, 4/2/2019) Dr Will Rea (FAHACS) comments in an article concerning the JK Randle Heritage museum, which he was the UK lead curator on.
Also in The Nigeria Lawyer.
 
Leeds, Stockholm team wants no fluorochemicals Technical Textiles, 2/2/2019) Further coverage: Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
 
Morgan le Fay: how Arthurian legend turned a powerful woman from healer to villain (The Conversation, 31/1/2019) Dr Marta Cobb (History) wrote an article concerning new portrayals of Morgan le Fay. 
 
Roma: Mexican film industry blooms with Oscar nominations a century after its origins in the Chihuahua desert (The Conversation, 30/1/2019) Professor Duncan Wheeler and Dr Rebecca Jarman (both Languages, Cultures and Societies) have written an article concerning how Mexico's booming film industry is revisiting its roots in the same desert in which it has its origins way back in 1914.

Fluorochemicals should be phased out of waterproof clothing, study argues (Environment JournalOnline, 30/1/2019) Further coverage: Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. Dr Richard Blackburn and PhD researcher Philippa Hill (both Design) are quoted.
Also in: Consumer AffairsEcotextile News,Chem Europe