Lauren Mottle

Lauren Mottle

Profile

My PhD dissertation, entitled The Patriotism of Protest: The Reconfiguration of the Citizen-Soldier Ideal During the Vietnam Era, explores the activism of anti-war soldiers and veterans during the Vietnam War. Using the citizen-soldier ideal as a lens, it analyses the ways in which this activism simultaneously utilised and reconfigured performances and notions of patriotism, republican citizenship and manhood, with particular considerations on the intersectionality of race and gender. To do so, it explores draft resistance activism, the GI Movement, the Coffeehouse Movement and the anti-war activism of Vietnam Veterans. It particularly considers how the reconsideration of the citizen-soldier ideal was influenced by existing and changing notions of race and gender.  As such, it engages extensively with race and masculinity theories, as well as literature exploring the development of an American national identity (from the nation’s founding to the Vietnam era), the long black freedom movement and the boundaries and definitions of “the Sixties”. 

 


Awards and Prizes

2018 Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures Research Dissemination Award
2016 Friends of the University of Wisconsin Madison Libraries Grants to Scholars Award
2016 University of Leeds Extraordinary Fund Award
2016 British Association for American Studies Postgraduate Travel Award
2015 University of Leeds Postgraduate Travel Award
2014 Preparing Future Faculty Assessment Award
2010 H.H. Cunningham Award in History


Selected Publications

‘“Still being sent to ‘Nam to protect America’s myths”: Anti-war Soldiering and the Challenge to Cold War Patriotism', United States Studies Online, Part 1

'"We cast these medals away as symbols of shame, dishonor and inhumanity": Veteran Protest and the Rejection of Cold War Patriotism, United States Studies Online, Part 2

“Review of Women’s Antiwar Diplomacy During the Vietnam War Era,” by Jessica M. Frazier, Journal of Contemporary History 54, no.3 (October 2018)

“Review of Veterans Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War,” by John A. Wood, Journal of the Historical Association 102, no. 351: 549-551.


Selected Conference Papers

“Will You Be A Tory or a Patriot?”: The Imagery of the American Revolution in the GI Underground Press',  Voices of Conscience: Anti-war Opposition in the Military, invited speaker, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame, United States, May 2018

“If we fight again, it will be to take these steps”: Vietnam Veterans Against the War and the ‘Battle’ to Defend Democracy', European Association for American Studies and the British Association for American Studies Joint Annual Conference, Kings College London, April 2018

We Resist on the Grounds that We Aren’t Citizens”: Black Draft Resistance, the Citizen-Soldier and the Whiteness of American Citizenship', Voices of Dissent: Social Movements and Political Protest in Post-War America, Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford, June 2017

“We’re Not Asking You to Burn Your Flag, Just Wash It”: Reconfiguring Patriotic Duty in the GI Underground Press, British Association of American Studies Annual Conference, Canterbury Christchurch University, April 2017

'The Patriotism of Protest: Anti-war Soldiering and the Redefinition of the Citizen-Soldier'  Historians of the Twentieth Century Postgraduate Conference, Northumbria University, September 2016

“Why Can’t We Be Friends”: Rethinking Multiracial Activism in the GI Movement and Second-Wave Feminism'", co-presenter, British Association for American Studies Postgraduate Conference, University of Glasgow, December 2015

'"I Fought in the Wrong War": The Vietnam War and the Black Freedom Movement at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University', Triangle African American History Colloquium, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, February 2014


Teaching and Learning

HIST 2351: The American Century, 1941-1980, Spring/Summer Terms 2017-2019
HIST 1300: Primary Sources for the Historian, Spring/Summer Terms 2016-2018, Independently-designed strand entitled: 'These Times They Are A'Changing: Social Movements of the American Sixties and Seventies'
HIST 1055: Historiography and Historical Skills, Autumn 2018, Independently-designed strand entitled: The New Left in the American 1960s
HIST 2570: History in the Media, Co-Marker, Autumn 2017-Spring 2018

Widening Participation
The Brilliant Club, PhD Tutor, Summer 2017-Present
Access to Leeds Intern (Summer 2015)

Related Experience
Postgraduate Tutor Representative, School of History Taught Student Education Committee (October 2016-June 2018)
Dissertation Mentor for Third Year Undergraduates (Autumn 2017- Spring 2019)
Mock Tutorial Leader (Autumn 2018)
Graduate Assistant, Department of History, University of North Carolina at Greensboro (August 2012-May 2014)


Professional Memberships

Fellow, Higher Education Academy, since April 2018.
Historians of the Twentieth Century United States, since 2015
British Association of American Studies, since 2015


About Me
Originally from New Jersey, I completed my Bachelor’s degree in 2010 at Elon University in North Carolina and my Master’s in American History at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. My Master's thesis was entitled: '"I Fought in the Wrong War": The Vietnam War and the Black Freedom Movement at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University'

I am currently in my fourth year of PhD study at Leeds. I am supervised by Prof. Simon Hall and Dr Jessica Meyer and was previously supervised by Dr Say Burgin. I am also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.


 

Research interests

My research interests lie in analyses of social activism in the twentieth century United States.  This provides an avenue for students to engage with historical study and make connections between the present and the past by foregrounding youth activism. My PhD research explored the activism of anti-war soldiers and veterans during the Vietnam War and analysed the ways in which this activism simultaneously utilised and reconfigured performances and notions of patriotism, republican citizenship, and manhood, with particular considerations of the intersectionality of race and gender. More broadly, I am interested in revealing the ways in which the various identities of activists shaped and influenced their activism.  Across my research projects I explore questions of how activists engaged with and articulated the relationship between their activism and their gender, racial and regional identity, particularly in regards to the American South. Additionally, I am interested in how the performative nature of activism influences and is influenced by hegemonic performances of other identities, particularly around race and gender. My research also considers and reassesses what may be considered activism. I am also deeply interested in the development and changing understandings of American national identity and the utility of American national mythologies in diverse contexts. 

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Leeds (expected 2018)
  • Fellow, Higher Education Academy, member since March 2018
  • MA in American History, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA (2012-2014)
  • BA (magna cum laude) in History with Teacher Licensure, Elon University, USA (2006-2010)